Are Orchestra Musicians Independent Contractors?

Landmark court case says musicians are employees.

This spring, the U.S. Court of Appeals ruled that the musicians of the Lancaster Symphony were not independent contractors as the orchestra’s management asserted, but employees with the right to unionize. The musicians’ legal struggle took over eight years, but they eventually prevailed.

It is odd that you can work for one orchestra, have three rehearsals and a performance of Beethoven Five, and be considered an employee, and yet you could do the exact same thing for another orchestra and be considered an independent contractor. It doesn’t matter if an orchestra is full-time or per service, the work is the same.

Unfortunately, the IRS does not give a precise definition of what makes someone an independent contractor, but rather a list of characteristics to apply to each particular case. An employer, here orchestra management, will always prefer to have independent contractors for reasons I’ll explain below. The main argument that orchestras have for independent contractor status is that musicians provide their own instruments. But, the IRS says the key determinant is this:

You are not an independent contractor if you perform services that can be controlled by an employer (what will be done and how it will be done). This applies even if you are given freedom of action. What matters is that the employer has the legal right to control the details of how the services are performed.

Link: https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/independent-contractor-defined

I cannot imagine any conductor in the world who does not believe that their job is to control “what will be done and how it will be done.” Musicians are told what to do, when, what to wear, and how to act. You are not an independent contractor. If an employer really had any doubt as to a musicians’ status, they could file Form SS-8: Determination of Worker Status for Purposes of Federal Employment Taxes and Income Tax Withholding. The IRS will review the facts in the case and make a determination. Since employers are not required to submit this form, most simply make a determination on their own.

There are a couple of important differences between being an independent contractor versus an employee.

  • Independent contractors receive a 1099, employees receive a W-2 at the end of the year. If you receive a 1099, you report your income and expenses on Schedule C; W-2 employees deduct unreimbursed expenses as an itemized deduction on Schedule A.
  • Independent contractors pay Self-Employment Tax, which basically means that they pay both halves of the Social Security and Medicare payroll taxes. If you are an employee, your employer pays one-half of the tax (7.65%), and you pay the other half. Even a per service orchestra likely has several hundred thousand dollars in payroll each year, so 7.65% is a significant expense.
  • Employees have a right to unionize.
  • Musicians who are employees might have a right to unemployment and worker’s comp benefits, depending on their state. Employers pay unemployment taxes if they have employees, but not for independent contractors.

As a musician, you are better off being an employee, a fact which caused the Lancaster Symphony management to spend eight years trying to overturn the decision of the National Labor Relations Board that determined that the musicians were in fact employees.

I play in a per service orchestra where musicians are considered independent contractors. I wanted to find out what this ruling meant to musicians who are independent contractors, so I contacted Harvey Mars, Esq., who is the counsel for AFM Local 802 in New York, and an expert in employment law for professional musicians. Mr. Mars recently wrote about the Lancaster ruling here.

FFM: Is the Lancaster Symphony ruling grounds to compel other per service orchestras to classify musicians as employees rather than independent contractors?

Mars: Yes, the ruling does establish a precedent and will be considered persuasive authority.

FFM: Do you foresee orchestras making this change voluntarily, or would the players or union need to pursue this on a case by case basis?

Mars: I believe this ruling may change some, but not all employer practices.

FFM: What are the benefits for musicians to be employees rather than independent contractors? (Ability to unionize, unemployment benefits, employment taxes?)

Mars: In addition to what you have, take advantage of statutes that only benefit  employees, such as civil rights statutes.  In New York we have City Laws that only apply to employees covering paid leave time.

The reality is that most orchestra musicians have always been closer to the definition of employee than independent contractor, but no one had ever challenged that status in court. Now we have a legal precedent to be considered employees, thanks to the Lancaster Symphony ruling. Similar per service orchestras should take note!

Musicians: Get Your Student Loans Forgiven In 10 Years

Many musicians work for a non-profit organization, such as an orchestra, opera company, chamber music group, or university. If you work full-time for a non-profit, you are eligible for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program. This program will forgive 100% of your eligible loans after you make 120 monthly payments.

Public service jobs include those with a federal, state, or local government agency or public school or library. Luckily for musicians, a full-time job with any 501(c)(3) non-profit organization is also considered a public service job, regardless of what the organization does. You must meet your employer’s definition of “full-time” or work at least 30 hours per week. If you work part-time positions, you can still use the program if you have multiple qualifying jobs that total at least 30 hours per week. If you are off summers, you still qualify, as long as you work 8 months per year and your employer still considers you employed over the summer.

Only loans received through the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program eligible for the PSLF. However, if you have Perkins or FFEL loans, you may consolidate them into a Direct Consolidation Loan and then they will become eligible for the PSLF. Payments made prior to becoming a Direct Loan will not qualify. For other types of consolidation, be very careful – moving a Direct Loan into a bank loan could cause you to lose the opportunity to use the PSLF. Private loans are not eligible for the PSLF.

To qualify for the PSLF, you should use one of the federal income-drive repayment plans, including the Federal Income-Based Repayment (IBR) Plan, the Pay as You Earn Repayment Plan, or the Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR) Plan. The standard repayment plan also qualifies, but since that is a 10-year program, it would leave a zero balance after 120 payments. However, if you switch from the standard plan to one of the income-driven plans, you can still count your previous payments towards the PSLF.

I know a lot of musicians who make sacrifices to pay off their student loans in 10 years or less. If you work for a non-profit, I’d encourage you to use one of the income-driven plans instead, so you can become eligible for the PSLF. With the lower monthly payments, use the difference for other financial goals. Pay off your credit cards, build up your emergency fund, or contribute to an IRA. If the government is offering to forgive 100% of your remaining loan balance after 120 payments, you should send the smallest payment amount they will accept.

Payments made after October 1, 2007 may qualify for the PSLF. So if you’ve been making payments for 4 years, you may have only another 6 years to go! For further details on the program as well as instructions on how to verify and record your eligibility, please visit the Federal Student Aid Website. You will need to have each employer complete the Employment Certification Form to document proof of your eligibility. Although you are not required to submit the form until after 120 payments, it is recommended that you do so annually or whenever you change jobs, to make sure that your progress is being tracked.

Another great feature: the loan forgiveness you receive from the PSLF is non-taxable! Managing student loans has become one of the biggest hurdles today for people in their 20’s and 30’s. As a CFP(R) practitioner, I’m here to help you with all your financial goals and concerns, so if you thought I only do investments, I’d like to introduce you to the benefits of having your own financial plan.

12 Tips to Prepare for an Orchestra Lockout

If you’re a musician in an orchestra, a lockout may be among your worst fears. In 2012, the Minnesota Orchestra musicians were without pay for a devastating 15 months. Only after accepting a 15% pay cut did the orchestra return to work. Today, musicians in the Fort Worth Symphony are facing a stalemate in which management will not budge on draconian proposals to cut pay and benefits. Other groups have faced similar labor disputes and it is becoming increasingly commonplace for management to use brazen tactics to force musicians into accepting pay cuts and other concessions.

In light of this reality, orchestra musicians everywhere would be smart to plan ahead and take the financial steps below to ensure that they could survive a lockout of 15 months or longer. Here are 12 tips to put your personal finances on stronger footing:

  1. Know when your Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) is up for renewal. If your contract is up in the next year, conserve cash. Be careful about buying a car or making a major purchase if it means creating increased monthly expenses. Even if you think your orchestra has a good relationship with management, be cautious. Sometimes labor disputes can take a surprising turn, as my friends in Syracuse learned several years ago.
  2. Keep 6-12 months cash. The old rule of thumb was to have an emergency fund of 3-6 months of cash to cover your basic living expenses. Today, it may be more prudent to reserve 6-12 months of cash. This is tough to do – especially since you should continue to fund your retirement accounts – but when you’re in trouble, cash is king.
  3. Create a Budget. To calculate your emergency fund, you need to make a household budget and know how much you spend each month in both fixed and discretionary expenses. While you are evaluating your budget, look for ways to lower costs on recurring expenses such as cable TV, cell phones, insurance, and other monthly bills.
  4. Get ahead on your mortgage. If you send in extra principal payments on your mortgage (or other bills), you may want to stop. Instead, send in advanced payments, so you are several months ahead. Then if your pay is suspended, you will have a cushion of a couple of months before your next mortgage payment is due. This is especially helpful if you find that keeping a lot of cash on hand is a temptation to buy things!
  5. Pay off those credit cards. You cannot afford to be paying 20 to 30 percent interest on credit cards, especially if there is a possibility that your paycheck could vanish. I would say this takes priority over #2, keeping an emergency fund. In other words, go ahead and pay off your credit cards even if it means dipping into your cash significantly. Keep the credit cards open; they will be your source of emergency funds while you are rebuilding your cash account.
  6. Ask for an increase in your credit limits today. Maybe you’ve never exceeded $2,000 a month on your credit card, but having a $10,000 limit or higher could be helpful if you do end up locked out. If you wait until you are without a paycheck, when your income is zero, the credit card company is not going to increase your limits.
  7. If you have federal student loans, look into the Income Based Repayment Plan. This benefit is a good reason to not consolidate your loans into private bank loans. If your kids are in college, notify the school’s financial aid office immediately if your pay or employment changes. They may be able to increase your child’s need based financial aid.
  8. Research unemployment benefits, which vary by state. Here in Texas, you are eligible for unemployment if you are locked out, but not if you are on strike. New York is the only state that offers unemployment benefits to striking workers. If you are eligible, apply immediately for benefits. Link: Texas Workforce Commission: If You Are Involved in a Labor Dispute or Strike.
  9.  Supplement your income. Look for church gigs, weddings, private students, and other opportunities to moonlight and make some cash. While this is unlikely to replace your full orchestra salary, freelance gigs may go a long ways towards paying your monthly bills. Note that most unemployment benefits will continue if you have gigs, but will simply reduce the amount of your benefit in the weeks you receive income. If you can, try to schedule all your students on weeks you have gigs. You are better off having one huge week of income and three weeks of no income, rather than spreading that income over the course of the month. That way you can still receive unemployment benefits for the weeks you have zero income.
  10. Don’t dip into retirement accounts. If you take a withdrawal from your 403(B) or Traditional IRA before age 59 1/2, you will have to pay income tax on the withdrawal, plus a 10% penalty. You could lose as much as 35% to 50% to taxes and penalties, and that is just too costly. Plus, you are then sinking your future retirement and all the hard work that went into saving that money in the first place. Retirement accounts are creditor protected. Even if you were to face bankruptcy or foreclosure, you are not required to dip into your retirement accounts. Talk with an expert before ever taking a premature retirement distribution.
  11. Consider a Roth IRA. If you are struggling with prioritizing retirement accounts, building an emergency fund, and other needs, consider funding a Roth IRA. You can withdraw your contributions (but not any of the earnings), without tax or penalty, even if you are under age 59 1/2. For example, if you put in $5,000 to a Roth IRA, and it grows to $6,000, you can withdraw your original $5,000, tax and penalty-free. If you’re eligible for a Roth, it is a good tool to save for retirement, while still giving you the flexibility to use your money in case of an emergency.
  12. Health insurance. Take care of your annual physical, prescriptions, dental visits, eye exams, and any other health expenses while your insurance is in place. Budget for COBRA or look into an individual health plan, and make sure there is no gap in your being covered.

Hopefully, you will never find yourself locked out by your employer, but being prepared financially for such a situation should help you sleep better at night. Management knows that many musicians cannot afford to be without a paycheck for long and will use this threat at the bargaining table. I’ve been on a negotiating committee before and can tell you that things can get pretty ugly. The better prepared musicians are for the possibility of a strike or lockout, the stronger position you will have in negotiations to be taken seriously.

If you want to organize your finances and create a plan to accomplish your goals and address the risks you face, please give me a call or send me an email. I have a passion for the details of financial planning, but most of all, I love to help people. Thank you for reading! Best Regards, Scott

Deducting Concert Clothes

A professional musician’s purchase of concert clothing is a tax-deductible expense, but you need to make sure that you meet the IRS requirements for “uniforms” in order to ensure that the expense is allowable. The IRS has a two-part test to determine if work clothing is tax-deductible:

  1. You are required to wear the clothes as a condition of your job.
  2. The clothes are not suitable for everyday wear.

If you are a W-2 employee, you will deduct concert clothes on your Schedule A, under Miscellaneous Expenses, as an unreimbursed employee expense. This category of expenses is, unfortunately, subject to a 2% limit, meaning that only your expenses which exceed 2% of your adjusted gross income are eligible for the deduction. Luckily, the list of Miscellaneous Expenses subject to the 2% limit is large and includes other popular deductions, including professional dues, home office expenses, tools and supplies, travel for work, union dues, tax preparation fees, and investment management fees. So most musicians have little trouble breaking the 2% limit, although it still means that you don’t get any tax deduction on the first 2% of your expenses. If your AGI is $50,000, that is $1,000 in expenses that are not counted every year!

The IRS states that “Musicians and entertainers can deduct the cost of theatrical clothing and accessories that aren’t suitable for everyday wear.” Clearly, tails and tuxedos are not everyday wear, but other concert clothes for men and women, such as black pants or shoes, could be considered for everyday use. The IRS cautions that it is not enough that you do not wear your work clothes away from work; the requirement is that the clothes are “not suitable for taking the place of your everyday clothing.”

For details, see Miscellaneous Expenses, IRS Publication 529.

If you are paid as a 1099 (independent contractor), you can deduct your required concert clothes on Schedule C as a business expense, which is not subject to the 2% requirement. If you have both W-2 and 1099 gigs, you may be able to allocate your concert clothes as would be beneficial for your tax return, assuming both employers require the clothes.

In the event your tax return is audited, you should be able to provide documentation to support your deduction, including:

  • receipts describing the clothes purchased;
  • documents from your employer listing the required dress code;
  • you will need to say both that you do not wear the clothes at any time other than concerts AND that the clothing is not suitable for everyday use. I would suggest using the exact wording “not suitable”. While the IRS does not define “not suitable” in their instructions, that is the requirement.

The Musician’s Guide to Mileage, Part 2

Are you missing out on driving expenses you could be deducting from your taxes? In Part 1 of this series, we differentiated between commuting and types of travel which are tax deductible for professional musicians. Now, in Part 2, we will consider which will maximize your tax deduction: using the IRS Standard Mileage Rate or the Actual Cost method.

The Standard Mileage Rate is used most often by musicians because of its ease and simplicity. Each year, the IRS sets a rate which is supposed to reflect the current costs of driving a car. For 2016, the rate is 54 cents per mile. Is this a good rate or a bad rate? There’s no way to know the answer to that question, because it will vary from situation to situation and person to person. For some people 54 cents will be more than their actual costs. For many others, however, 54 cents doesn’t even come close to covering the actual costs you have in operating your car for business purposes.

The IRS doesn’t care which method you use, as long as you can document your expenses. In fact, in Publication 463 “Travel, Entertainment, Gift, and Car Expenses”, the IRS shares this tip: “If you qualify to use both methods, you may want to figure your deduction both ways to see which gives you a larger deduction.” But very few musicians actually bother to do this. Most just use the Standard Rate, which could be less than your actual costs by thousands of dollars a year.

The Actual Cost method means that you can deduct all of your car expenses, including not only gasoline, but also depreciation (if owned), lease payments (if leased), registration fees, oil changes, tires, repairs, insurance, garage rent, tolls, and parking costs. If you use your car for both personal and business use, than you will calculate the percentage of business miles to your total miles driven that year. If 80% of your miles are for business, then 80% of these actual costs are tax deductible.

Gas is almost never your largest expense as a car owner. At 25 mpg, driving 10,000 miles a year costs only $900 at today’s price of $2.25 for gas. You probably pay more for insurance than gas. Your largest expense is almost always depreciation. A car generally loses at least 50% of its value in 5 years, but the IRS may allow you to depreciate your vehicle even faster than this. I think a lot of tax payers are scared away from using the Actual Cost method because of the complexity of depreciation.

There are a number of depreciation methods that the IRS uses, including Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS), straight-line, and section 179. It’s beyond the scope of this article to define these, but suffice it to say that a CPA will understand these, and frankly, so will most tax software, and guide you to the correct method.

Your actual costs might look something like this:

  1. Depreciation $3050
  2. Insurance $1622
  3. Gasoline $900
  4. Registration $73
  5. Oil Changes $97
  6. Repairs $388
  7. Tolls $526

Total Actual Costs: $6,656. If you drove 10,000 business miles, then you could choose between a $5,400 deduction using the Standard Mileage Rate, or a $6,656 deduction using your Actual Costs. In this case, using the standard rate would mean that you missed out on $1,256 in additional deductions that you could have claimed.

In general, if you have high fixed costs like depreciation or insurance, and average or low miles, you will probably be better off with actual cost. The same is true for years when you have expensive repairs. The Standard Mileage Rate may be higher when you drive a ton of miles, or if your fixed and operating costs are low.

One of the most effective ways to use the Actual Cost method is by using one car exclusively for business, so you can deduct 100% of the costs. How to do this? If you are married or have a partner, and your spouse has also has a car, use that car for personal uses like getting groceries. This is important, because if you claim a vehicle is 100% used for business, one of the first things the IRS will ask you is if you have another vehicle available for personal use. And the answer had better be yes.

If you do end up using the Standard Mileage Rate, please note that you can also deduct any tolls and parking costs for your eligible business driving. A lot of musicians miss this one. Here in DFW, it seems like all the highway construction of the past 15 years has been to build toll roads, so we are paying tolls more frequently and in larger dollar amounts to get to gigs. Download your Tolltag statement, compare it to your datebook and highlight the trips you made for business each month. Or if you do use one car 100% for business, you can simply deduct all the tolls for that vehicle.

Lastly, if you are self-employed, you can deduct any interest you pay on a car loan, in the percentage of miles that you use the car for business. However, if you are a W-2 employee, you cannot deduct the interest, even if you use the car 100% for business.

There are a lot better uses for your hard earned money than paying taxes. That’s why I want musicians to use every available legal tax deduction to minimize your tax bill each year and keep more of your income in your pocket. Being a musician is a passion, but it also is a business, which means keeping good records and being smart about taking whatever tax deductions are allowed. The mileage deduction is a big one for many musicians.

Was this article helpful? I’d love to hear from you. What topics would you like to see in future articles? Email scott@goodlifewealth.com.

George M. Cohan and Keeping Receipts

Happy Birthday today, July 3, to George M. Cohan, broadway composer of Yankee Doodle, You’re a Grand Old Flag, Over There, and countless other hit songs. In 1930, George found himself in hot water with the IRS. He lived a lavish life, spending cash, and deducting his expenses without receipts or evidence. The IRS challenged his tax return, and he took them to court. Remarkably, the Judge ruled in Cohan’s favor, establishing what today is called “The Cohan Rule”, and still legal precedent.

In the current IRS Guide for the Self-Employed, here’s what they say about The Cohan Rule:

The “Cohan Rule,” as it is known, originated in the decision of Cohan v. Commissioner, 39 F.2d 540 (2d Cir. 1930). In Cohan, the court made an exception to the rule requiring taxpayers to substantiate their business expenses. George M. Cohan, the famous entertainer, was disallowed a deduction for travel and business expenses because he was unable to substantiate any of the expenses. The judge wrote that “absolute certainty in such matters is usually impossible and is not necessary, the Board should make as close an approximation as it can.” In general, the Tax Court has interpreted this ruling to mean that in certain situations “best estimates” are acceptable in order to approximate expenses. The Cohan Rule is a discretionary standard and can be used to support a reasonable estimate of compliance requirements.

My advice: keep your receipts to document your business expenses. The Cohan Rule may be a valid defense in the Tax Court, but it would be much more pleasant if you didn’t end up in a legal battle with the IRS to begin with!

However, it may be helpful to know that the IRS does currently does not require you keep receipts for travel, meals, or entertainment if the expense is below $75. Instead, you may keep a log of such expenses, listing the date, amounts, location, purpose, and people involved in each expense. To be considered current, the IRS expects you to maintain the log weekly, so it’s not something you can just put down on paper a year after the expense occurs. While the IRS can accept a log of these expenses, they can also challenge a log and request other documentation, such as bank or credit card statements. All of which brings us back to the best practice of keeping your receipts in the first place.

Happy Birthday, George!

The Musician’s Guide to Mileage, Part 1

When can you deduct your driving expenses as a musician?

Between travelling to rehearsals, concerts, or lessons, you probably spend a fair amount of time in your car, and it is a legitimate, and often significant, business expense for the professional musician. In Part 1 of this guide, we will look at when you can and cannot deduct mileage and your driving expenses. In Part 2, we will compare using the IRS standard mileage rate versus your actual costs.

It’s easiest to begin with what is not a deductible travel expense: you can never deduct “commuting”, which the IRS defines as driving between your home and primary workplace. For example, if you work at a University as a full-time tenured professor, then your drive to your office or studio would be considered commuting.

Before we dive into situations which are deductible, let me first explain what we mean by “deductible”. If you are a W-2 employee, you would list qualifying driving expenses as an unreimbursed employee expense on your itemized deductions on Schedule A of your tax return. You would take the Standard Deduction of $6,300 (single, 2016) or $12,600 (married), unless your itemized deductions exceed these levels. Until you have $6,300 in total itemized deductions, mileage isn’t going to reduce your taxes as a W-2 employee. If you are self-employed or receive a 1099 as an Independent Contractor, you will have an easier time by deducting your driving as a business expense on Schedule C. For most musicians, you will have some work which is W-2 and some which is 1099, so your mileage for each of these jobs needs to be deducted appropriately.

Here are types of mileage which you can deduct:

  1. Second job of the day. If you teach during the day and then drive to a rehearsal for a different employer in the evening, your drive to the rehearsal – as the second job of the day – is deductible.
  2. Temporary job sites. If you are working at a site that is not your primary work site, and the job is reasonably expected to last less than a year (and does), then your travel is deductible. For example, if you play a musical for six weeks, that would be a temporary job site. When you are called to sub with a group for a week or two, that’s a “temporary job site”. A non-tenured position with a 8-9 month contract, for a per service orchestra or adjunct teaching position, may also qualify. Your position could be renewed the following year, but in each case, the contract is temporary without any permanent guarantee of employment, and you are not employed by that organization for the 3-4 months between seasons.
  3. Travel “between offices”. If your home qualifies as your primary place of business, then driving to any secondary offices (such as schools, venues, etc.) would be deductible. Link: Home Office Deduction 101 Or, if you drive from your primary office (studio, concert hall, etc.) for run-out concerts or events, that travel would be deductible.
  4. Driving to the airport for business travel.
  5. Job interviews and auditions.
  6. Trips for errands or supplies, meals and entertainment, and customer visits are also deductible.

The key to successfully deducting these expenses is to have contemporaneous documentation, showing the dates, locations, and mileage covered. The most common reason expenses are disallowed by IRS auditors is lack of supporting evidence. Keep a detailed mileage log, keep contracts showing dates of gigs, and be organized.

There are a number of apps to track your mileage, such as MileIQ, QuickBooks Self-EmployedEverlance, and others. These use your phone’s GPS to track your distances automatically, and then you can later categorize each trip as business or personal. This is very helpful if you, like me, often forget to write down your mileage! Just remember that you may be required to produce this documentation up to seven years in the future, so make sure you have saved your information in a hard copy or other permanent location.

I know it is a pain to keep track of all this mileage, but it’s likely that your regular trips of 10 or 20 miles each way can add up to thousands of miles per year. For 2016, the IRS standard mileage rate is $0.54 per mile, so for every 1000 miles you drive, you can deduct $540 from your income. If you are in the 25% tax bracket, that will lower your tax bill by $135. If you are in a higher tax bracket, your savings will be even higher.

Next up: Part 2, where we compare the Standard Mileage Rate and Actual Cost methods for taking the deduction.

This information is for educational purposes only and should not be construed as individual financial advice. Please talk to your CPA or tax preparer regarding your personal situation.

Introducing Finance For Musicians!

No one becomes a professional musician for the money. It’s a labor of love. But we all have responsibilities: mortgages to pay, families to feed, and important goals like financial security and retirement. I’m a trombonist who has been a Financial Planner since 2004. Over that time, I’ve worked with hundreds of families, including quite a few of my fellow musicians. And what I have discovered is that while there are a lot of musicians who could use sound financial advice, there are almost no advisors who understand anything about the life of a musician. That’s why I created Finance For Musicians.

My goal is to help musicians achieve peace of mind regarding all their financial affairs. Finance For Musicians is your source for useful, objective information on saving, investing, insurance, taxes, and retirement planning. Being a musician isn’t a 9-5 job and you have unique financial concerns that are vastly different from people in traditional careers. All the information here is written specifically for professional musicians like you. I’ll be posting new articles weekly and encourage you to sign up so you don’t miss any valuable ideas.

Have a financial question? Send me a note or give me a call, I’m always happy to chat with a fellow musician. If you are looking for personal financial advice, you can find out more about hiring me as your Financial Planner here.

Thank you for reading!

Scott Stratton, CFP(R), CFA

President, Good Life Wealth Management LLC

scott@goodlifewealth.com