Taxes Going Up? Here’s What Musicians Can Do

My clients are completing their 2018 tax returns and it is a mixed bag. Many musicians who used to itemize their deductions, especially married couples, are now taking the standard deduction for the first time in decades. Some are seeing their taxes go down while others, myself included, are paying thousands more for 2018 than we did for 2017.

Generally, if you had a significant amount of itemized deductions, many of those deductions were reduced or eliminated under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This should be no surprise to my readers, because I’ve been warning you about this since November 2017 when the law was just being proposed in Congress. For musicians who are W-2 employees, the loss of Miscellaneous Itemized Deductions meant losing the ability to deduct your instruments, supplies, mileage, home office, union dues, concert clothes, and other expenses.

What also came as a surprise to many musicians was that their employers significantly reduced their tax withholding from their paycheck. Payroll software has several weaknesses – it doesn’t know what deductions you may have or what other income you or your spouse earns. The software just sees a lower marginal tax rate and automatically withholds less. If your employer under-withheld, you can ask HR to reduce your exemptions to zero and if you are married, you can also ask them to withhold at the higher single rate. If your spouse earns a similar amount as you, withholding at the single rate is likely more accurate.

How can you lower your tax bill for 2019? First, try to increase your 403(b) or 401(k) contributions, if you are eligible for a retirement plan through your employer. So many people are only contributing the amount that their company will match, often four to six percent. Others are contributing 10%, which is slightly better. But your goal should be to max out both your and your spouse’s 403(b) or 401(k) if you can. For 2019, that has been increased to $19,000, or if you are age 50 or over, $25,000. Build wealth, fund your retirement, become financially independent sooner, all while reducing your current tax bill. That’s why we try to max out our accounts every year.

I suggested other ways to reduce your taxes last February, to give everyone a head start on their 2018 taxes. See: Reduce Your Taxes Without Itemizing.

If you have both 1099 and W-2 Income and are wondering if you can just shift all your expenses to your Schedule C, the answer is no. If you have expenses and equipment which is used both for your 1099 and W-2 work, please read: What Should Free-lancers Do with Both W-2 and 1099 Income and Expenses.

For musicians who are W-2 employees, many of you who used to take a home office deduction found that this was eliminated in 2018, to your great frustration. So today, I’d like to give an update on two ways to get a deduction for your other major expense, your car.

First, if you are a self-employed musician, including a 1099 independent contractor, you might consider having a dedicated vehicle for your music business, especially if your work requires frequently driving to places other than your “primary office”. You have a choice of taking the IRS standard mileage rate (58 cents per mile for 2019) OR you can use your actual costs, including gas, repairs/maintenance, depreciation, insurance, etc. Since the standard rate is so much easier to calculate, most people use the standard rate. But, you are allowed to calculate both and use whichever is higher.

If you are self-employed and your car is getting old, instead of getting a new car and using it for both personal and business miles, consider getting an SUV, Van, or Truck for your business and keeping your old car for personal use. If you have a business vehicle with a GVWR over 6000 pounds, and use it 100% for business, you may be able to deduct the full purchase price upfront as a Section 179 deduction. This saves you from having to depreciate the vehicle over time. Then, you should deduct all of your actual costs going forward. Under the new tax law, you can now use the section 179 deduction for used vehicles, in addition to new vehicles. Read more: Bonus Depreciation for Self-Employed Musicians.

If you aren’t self-employed but are in the market for a new vehicle, I wanted to give you an update on the $7,500 tax credit for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. A tax credit is not a deduction to your income, but a dollar for dollar reduction of your taxes owed. This credit can reduce your taxes to zero, but is non-refundable if your tax bill was less than $7,500 before the credit.

The full $7,500 tax credit is available on the first 200,000 qualifying vehicles each manufacturer sells. The first two companies to exceed 200,000 vehicles are Tesla and General Motors. If you were hoping to get the full tax credit, I’d look at other companies. Depending on the size of the vehicle battery, some vehicles have a credit of less than $7,500. For complete details of eligible new models, see the IRS Website: Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Credit.

For GM, the credit drops from $7,500 to $3,750 on April 1, then to $1,875 on October 1, and then to zero on April 1, 2020. Tesla hit the 200,000 vehicle mark one quarter earlier. The tax credit for a Tesla purchase is $3,750 right now, falling to $1,875 on July 1, 2019, and then to zero on January 1, 2020.

The Tax Credit is only available on a brand new vehicle, however, used prices for electric vehicles usually reflect the $7,500 credit. So, if you wanted a Chevy Bolt or Volt, or a Tesla, you might want to look at used models now that the tax credit has been phased down.

My goal is to help you keep more of your money so you can invest and grow your wealth. Although the new tax law simplified returns for many musicians, it did not cut taxes for everyone across the board. If you’re wondering if you’ve missed some ways to save on taxes for the year ahead, send me an email and we can discuss what we do for our clients to help. 

New IRS Rule Spoils SEP-IRA for Musicians

The SEP-IRA has been a key retirement tool for self-employed and 1099 musicians, but its value just got unexpectedly reduced last month, buried in the details of a 249-page release of new IRS regulations. I’m afraid that many self-employed musicians who read this may want to fund a different type of retirement account or may decide to stop their SEP contributions altogether going forward. If you’re a W-2 musician, this doesn’t apply to you, and if you are strictly a W-2, you weren’t eligible for a SEP anyways.

The new regulations don’t directly change a SEP contribution – it’s still a tax deductible contribution. Self-employed musicians are also eligible for a new 20% tax deduction, called the Qualified Business Income or QBI deduction, officially IRC Section 199A. The QBI Deduction is new for 2018 as a result of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act put into law in December 2017. 

The QBI Deduction is available to pass-through entities, including S-corporations, LLCs, and sole proprietors. You do not have to be incorporated, anyone with self-employment income (including 1099 “independent contractor”) is eligible. For “Specified Service Businesses”, including performing artists such as musicians, the QBI deduction is phased out if your income is above $157,500 (single) or $315,000 (married) for 2018.

(I’ve written about the QBI Deduction for musicians previously on my site HERE, as well as for the International Musician.)

What was a surprise announcement in the January 2019 regulations, some 13 months after Congress signed the new law, is that all self-employed people have to subtract any “employer paid retirement contributions” from their Qualified Business Income. It was previously thought this would only apply to S-corporations. This was not mentioned or hinted at in the legislation or in the regulations the IRS published in August. In fact, many tax software programs are having to be rewritten because of the January announcement. The SEP-IRA, even for a sole proprietor, is considered a type of employer-sponsored retirement plan, even though the employer and the employee are the same person.

It may be easiest to explain this with an example. Let’s say you make $60,000 as a self-employed musician and choose to contribute $10,000 to a SEP IRA. (In this example, I am assuming that your taxable income and your Qualified Business Income are the same, but in some cases, they will be different.) Now, instead of getting the 20% deduction on the $60,000 of Qualified Business Income, worth $12,000 off your income, you have to subtract your SEP contribution of $10,000 to reduce your QBI to $50,000. Now your QBI deduction will be $10,000, $2,000 less than if you had not made the SEP contribution.

Your SEP contribution reduced the value of your QBI deduction by $2,000, so instead of adding a $10,000 benefit, your SEP contribution only increased your deductions by $8,000. Another way of looking at this: if you are eligible for the QBI, you are only getting 80% of the value of a SEP Contribution, but 100% of your SEP contribution will be taxable when you withdraw it in the future.

And that’s a problem. The $10,000 you contributed to a SEP only provided an increase of $8,000 in deductions, but the full $10,000 will be taxable when you withdraw it later in retirement, plus the tax on any growth. Who wants to get an $8,000 deduction today and immediately have a $10,000 future tax liability? 

You might pay less in lifetime taxes by not making the SEP contribution, receiving 100% of the QBI deduction and then investing your $10,000 in a taxable account. The growth of the taxable account, by the way, could be treated as long term capital gains, which for most taxpayers is at a lower rate than the ordinary income rates applied to growth of your SEP (when withdrawn).

There are three additional solutions which you might consider rather than a funding SEP, given this new rule.

1. Traditional IRA. The Traditional IRA contribution will reduce your personal taxes, unlike a SEP, which is considered an employer sponsored plan. The SEP reduces the amount of your QBI deduction, but the Traditional IRA does not. However, there are two issues with the Traditional IRA:

  • The contribution limit is only $5,500 for 2018 ($6,500 over age 50). With a SEP, you could contribute as much as $55,000, ten times more than a Traditional IRA.
  • If you or your spouse are covered by any employer retirement plan, your eligibility to deduct a Traditional IRA contribution depends on being under income limits.  (Details here.)

If you are single and are not covered by any employer plan (or married and neither spouse is eligible for a company plan), then there are no income restrictions on a Traditional IRA. And if you were planning on contributing less than $5,500 to your SEP, just skip the SEP altogether and fund a Traditional IRA so you can receive the full QBI deduction.

If you are eligible for both a Traditional IRA and a SEP, I would always fund the IRA first to the maximum, and only then make a contribution to the SEP.

2. Roth 401(k). A Traditional 401(k) or Profit Sharing Plan, like a SEP, can also land you in the penalty box for the QBI as a self-employed person. However, if you set up an Individual 401(k) plan that allows for Roth 401(k) contributions, then you will receive the full QBI deduction, even if you put $18,500 into your Roth 401(k). 

Of course, you won’t get a tax deduction for the Roth contributions you make, but that account will grow tax-free going forward, which is a lot better than a taxable account. It’s a great option if you anticipate being in the same or similar tax bracket in retirement as you have today. The only problem is that unlike a Traditional IRA, you cannot establish a 401(k) today for the previous year (2018). 

But you can establish one for this year, and if you’d like to do so, I can help you with this. 

3. Spouse’s 401(k)/IRA. If you are self employed, but your spouse has a regular W-2 job, have your spouse increase their 401(k) contributions through their employer. That won’t ding your QBI Deduction and will reduce your joint taxable income dollar for dollar. If your spouse is eligible for a Traditional IRA – including a Spousal IRA if they do not have any earned income – that would also be preferable to having the self-employed spouse fund a SEP-IRA.

I do not want to suggest anything to discourage musicians from saving for retirement! But when one type of retirement account will reduce other tax deductions, I want to make sure that all my clients are informed to make the best choices for their situation. Feel free to email or call me if you’d like more information.

This article does not offer or imply individual tax advice; please consult your tax professional for information regarding your personal situation. 

Musicians and the QBI Deduction

This year, there is a new 20% tax deduction for self-employed individuals and pass through entities, commonly called the QBI (Qualified Business Income) deduction, officially IRC Section 199A. While most musicians who file schedule C will be eligible for this deduction, high earners – those making over $157,500 single or $315,000 married – will see this deduction phased out to zero, because they are considered a Specified Service Trade or Business (SSTB).

See: New 20% Pass-Through Tax Deduction

Professions that are considered an SSTB include health, law, accounting, athletics, performing arts, and any company whose principal asset is the skill or reputation of one or more of its employees. That’s pretty broad.

Some musicians may have income that is from an SSTB and other income which is not. For example, consider a musician who has a business managing tours and logistics. If she performs a concert, clearly she is working in an SSTB as a performing artist. If she is making a profit from organizing and promoting a concert tour, that might be considered a different industry.

This possibility of splitting up income into different streams has occupied many accountants this year, to enable high-earning business owners to qualify for the QBI deduction for their non-SSTB income. Since this is a brand new deduction for 2018, this is uncharted territory for taxpayers and financial professionals.

In August, the IRS posted new rules which will greatly limit your ability to carve off income away from an SSTB. Here are some of the details:

  • If an entity has revenue of under $25 million, and received 10% or more of its revenue from an SSTB, then the entire entity is considered an SSTB. If their revenue is over $25 million, the threshold is 5%
  • An endorsement by a performing artist, or the use of your name, likeness, signature, trademark, voice, etc., shall not be considered a separate profession. If you are in an SSTB, an endorsement will also be considered part of the SSTB.
  • 80/50 rule. If a company shares 50% or more ownership with an SSTB, and receives at least 80% of its revenue from that SSTB, it will be considered part of the SSTB. So, if our musician only organizes tours for herself, then that business will be considered part of her SSTB. If the Tour business has at least 21% in revenue from other bands, then it could be considered a separate entity and qualify for the QBI deduction.

Business owners in the top tax bracket of 37% for 2018 (making over $500,000 single or $600,000 married), might be considering forming a C-corporation if they are running into issues with the SSTB. While a C-Corp is not eligible for the QBI deduction, the federal income tax rate for a C-Corp has been lowered to a flat 21% this year.

Of course, the challenge with a C-Corp is the potential for double taxation: the company pays 21% tax on its earnings, and then the dividend paid to the owner may be taxed again from 15% to 23.8% (including the 3.8% Medicare surtax on Net Investment Income.)

Still, there may be some benefits to a C-corp versus a pass-through entity, including the ability to retain profits, being able to deduct state and local taxes without the $10,000 cap, or the ability to deduct charitable donations without itemizing.

If you have questions about the QBI Deduction, the Specified Service Business definition, or other self-employment tax issues for musicians, we can help you understand the new rules. We want to help you keep as much of your money as possible, so let’s talk about how we might be able to help you.

Estimated Tax Payments For Musicians

The IRS requires that tax payers make timely tax payments, which for many self-employed musicians, including 1099s, means having to make quarterly estimated tax payments throughout the year. Otherwise, you could be subject to penalties for the underpayment of taxes, even if you pay the whole sum in April. The rules for underpayment apply to all taxpayers, but if you are a W-2 employee, you could just adjust your payroll withholding and not need to make quarterly payments.

If your tax liability is more than $1,000 for the year, the IRS will consider you to have underpaid if the taxes withheld during the year are less than the smaller of:

1. 90% of your total taxes dues (including self-employment taxes, capital gains, etc.), OR
2. 100% of the previous year’s taxes paid.

However, for musicians with an adjusted gross income over $150,000 (or $75,000 if married filing separately), the threshold for #2 is 110% of the previous year’s taxes. Additionally, the IRS considers this on a quarterly basis: 22.5% per quarter for #1, and 25% per quarter for #2, or 27.5% if your income exceeds $150,000.

Many self-employed musicians will find it sufficient to make four equal payments throughout the year. If that’s the case, your deadlines are generally April 15, June 15, September 15, and January 15. However, if your income varies substantially from quarter to quarter, or if your actual income ends up being lower than the previous year, you may want to adjust your quarterly estimated payments to reflect those changes.

You can estimate your quarterly tax payments using IRS form 1040-ES. Of course, your CPA or tax software should automatically be letting you know if you need to make estimated tax payments for the following year. You can mail in a check each quarter, or you may find it more convenient to make the payment electronically, via IRS.gov/payments.  For full information on quarterly estimated payments, see IRS Publication 505 Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax.

Estimated payments will fulfill the requirement of 100% of last years payment, or 90% of this year’s payment if that figure is lower. However, estimated payments are not designed to cover 100% of the current tax bill, so if your income is significantly higher this year, you could potentially owe a lot of taxes in April even after making quarterly estimated payments.

If you’re a self-employed musician, you don’t need to be a tax expert, but you do need to understand some basics and to make sure you are getting good advice. When you aren’t being paid as a W-2 employee, it is up to you to make sure you are setting money aside and making those tax payments throughout the year, so that next April you aren’t facing penalties on top of having a large, unexpected tax bill.

20% Pass Through Deduction for Musicians

You’ve probably heard about the new 20% tax deduction for “Pass Through” entities under the  Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), and have wondered if musicians qualify. For those who are self-employed (1099, not W-2) here are five frequently asked questions:

1. Do I have to form a corporation in order to qualify for this benefit?
No. The good news is that you simply need to have Schedule C income, whether you are a sole proprietor (including 1099 independent contractor), or an LLC, Partnership, or S-Corporation.

2. How does it work?
If you report your music earnings on Schedule C, your Qualified Business Income (QBI) may be eligible for this deduction of 20%, meaning that only 80% of your net income will be taxable. Only business income – and not investment income – will qualify for the deduction. Although we call this a deduction, please note that you do not have to “itemize”, the QBI deduction is a new type of below the line deduction to your taxable income. The deduction starts in the 2018 tax year; 2017 is under the old rules.

There are some restrictions on the deduction. For example, your deduction is limited to 20% of QBI or 20% of your household’s taxable ordinary income (i.e. after standard/itemized deductions and excluding capital gains), whichever is less. If 100% of your taxable income was considered QBI, your deduction might be for less than 20% of QBI. If you are owner of a S-corp, you will be expected to pay yourself an appropriate salary, and that income will not be eligible for the QBI. If you have guaranteed draws as an LLC, that income would also be excluded from the QBI deduction.

3. What is the Service business restriction?
In order to prevent a lot of doctors, lawyers, and other high earners from quitting as employees and coming back as contractors to claim the deduction, Congress excluded from this deduction “Specified Service Businesses”, which includes not only health, law, accounting, financial services, athletics, and consulting, but also performing arts. High earning self-employed people in one of these professions will not be eligible for the 20% deduction.

4. Who is considered a high earner under the Specified Service restrictions?
If you are a performing artist and your taxable income is below $157,500 single or $315,000 married, you are eligible for the full 20% deduction. The QBI deduction will then phaseout for income above these levels over the next $50,000 single or $100,000 married. Musicians making above $207,500 single or $415,000 married are excluded completely from the 20% QBI deduction. Please note that these amounts refer to your total household income, not the amount of QBI income.

5. Should I try to change my W-2 job into a 1099 job?
First of all, that may be impossible. Each employer is charged with correctly determining your status as an employee or independent contractor. These are not simply interchangeable categories. The IRS has a list of characteristics for being an employee versus an independent contractor. Primarily, if an employer is able to dictate how you do your work, then you are an employee. It would not be appropriate for an orchestra, university, or contractor, to list one worker as a W-2 and someone else doing the similar work as a 1099.

Second, as a W-2 employee, you have many benefits. Your employer pays half of your Social Security and Medicare payroll tax (half is 7.65%). You might think that 20% is more than 7.65%, but remember that a 20% deduction in taxable income in the 24% tax bracket only saves you 4.8% in tax. That’s less than the value of having your employer pay their 7.65% of the payroll tax.

Employees may be eligible for other benefits including health insurance, vacation, state unemployment benefits, workers comp for injuries, and most importantly, the right to unionize. The Lancaster Symphony spent eight years in court, unsuccessfully trying to assert that musicians were not employees, to prevent them from unionizing. You would have a lot to lose by not being an employee, so I am not recommending anyone try to change their employment status.

Still, I expect many of you have Schedule C income from teaching private lessons, playing weddings, or other one-time gigs. If you do have self-employment income, you should benefit from the new tax law as long as you are under the income levels listed above. If you do other related work in music – publishing, repairing instruments, making accessories, etc. – that income might not be considered a Specified Service, so be sure to talk with your tax advisor about your individual situation. We will continue to study this area looking for ways to help musicians like you take advantage of every benefit you can legally obtain.

Musicians, Reduce Your Taxes Without Itemizing

If you used to itemize your tax deductions, chances are you will not be able to do so in 2018 under the new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). While it sounds good that the standard deduction has been increased to $12,000 single and $24,000 married, many musicians are lamenting that they no longer can deduct many expenses from their taxes. (See Tax Bill Passes, Strategies for Musicians.)

As a reminder, these changes impact W-2 employees. Musicians who are self-employed or “1099” can continue to deduct business expenses on Schedule C, as well as take the standard deduction. However, for any taxpayer who used to itemize on Schedule A, we’ve lost the following deductions in 2018:

  • Miscellaneous Itemized Deductions, including all unreimbursed employee expenses, tax preparation fees, moving expenses for work, and investment management fees. W-2 musicians have lost the ability to deduct instruments, equipment and supplies, concert clothes, mileage, home office expenses, union dues, etc.
  • Interest payments on a Home Equity Loan
  • Property Tax and other state and local taxes are now capped at $10,000 towards your itemized deductions.

For a married couple, even if you have the full $10,000 in property tax expenses, you will need another $14,000 in mortgage interest and/or charitable donations before you reach the $24,000 standard deduction amount. If you do have $25,000 in deductible expenses, you would effectively be getting only $1,000 more in deductions than someone who spent zero. And that $24,000 hurdle makes it a lot less attractive to try to maximize your itemized deductions any more.

Under the new law, people are no longer going to be able to say “it’s a great tax deduction” when buying an expensive home. When you take the standard deduction, you’re not getting any tax benefit from being a homeowner or having a mortgage.

So if you’ve lost your itemized tax deductions for 2018, can you you do anything to reduce your taxes? Thankfully, the answer is yes. I’m going to share with you 9 “above the line deductions” and Tax Credits you can use to lower your tax bill going forward.

Above The Line Deductions reduce your taxable income without having to itemize on Schedule A. All of these savings can be taken in addition to the standard deduction.

1. Increase your contributions to your 401(k)/403(b) or employer retirement plan. For 2018, the contribution limits are increased to $18,500 and for those over age 50, $24,500. What a great way to build your net worth and make automatic investments towards your future.

2. Many people who think they are maximizing their 401(k) contributions don’t realize they or their spouse may be eligible for other retirement contributions. If you have any 1099 or self-employment income, you may be eligible to fund a SEP-IRA in addition to a 401(k) at your W-2 job. Spouses can be eligible for their own IRA contribution, even if they do not work outside of the home.

3. Health Savings Accounts are unique as the only account type where you make a pre-tax contribution and also get a tax-free withdrawal for qualified expenses. You can contribute to an HSA if you are enrolled in an eligible High Deductible Health Plan. There are no income restrictions on an HSA. For 2018, singles can contribute $3,450 to an HSA and those with a family plan can contribute $6,900. If you are 55 and over, you can make an additional $1,000 catch-up contribution.

4. Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) or “cafeteria plans” can be used for expenses such as child care or medical expenses. These are often use it or lose it benefits, unlike an HSA, so plan ahead carefully. If your employer offers an FSA, participating will lower your taxable income.

5. The Student Loan Interest deduction remains an above-the-line deduction. This offers up to a $2,500 deduction for qualifying student loan interest payments, for those with an AGI below $65,000 single or $130,000 married filing jointly. This was removed from early versions of the TCJA but made it back into the final version.

Tax deductions reduce your taxable income, but Tax Credits are better because they reduce the amount of tax you owe. For example, if you are in the 24% tax bracket, a $1,000 deduction and a $240 Tax Credit would both reduce your taxes by $240.

Tax Credits should be automatically applied by your CPA or tax software. For example, if you have children, you should get the Child Tax Credit, if eligible. (Since it’s only February, there is still time to make a child for a 2018 tax credit!) If you are low income, still file a return, because you might qualify for the Earned Income Tax Credit. But there are other tax credits where you might be eligible based on your actions during the year. Here are four Tax Credits:

6. The Saver’s Tax Credit helps lower income workers fund a retirement account such as an IRA. For 2018, the Savers Tax Credit is available to singles with income below $31,500 and married couples under $63,000. The credit ranges from 10% to 50% of your retirement contribution of up to $2,000. Note for married couples, if you qualify for the credit, it would be better to put $2,000 in both of your IRAs, and receive two credits, versus putting $4,000 in one IRA and only getting one credit. If you have a child over 18, who is not a dependent and not a full-time student, maybe you can help them fund a Roth IRA and they can get this Tax Credit. Read the details in my article The Saver’s Tax Credit.

7. Originally cut out of the House bill, the $7,500 Tax Credit for the purchase of an electric or plug-in hybrid vehicle was reinstated in the final version of the TCJA signed into law. The credit is phased out after each manufacturer hits 200,000 vehicles sold, so if you were planning to add your name to the 450,000 people on the waitlist for a Tesla Model 3, forget about the Tax Credit. But there are many other cars and SUVs eligible for the credit which you can buy right now. There are no income limits on this credit, but please note that this one is not refundable. That means it can reduce your tax liability to zero, but you will not get a refund beyond zero. For example, if your total taxes owed is $5,200, you could get back $5,200, but not the full $7,500.

8. Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit. To help parents who work pay for daycare for a child under 13, you can claim a credit based on expenses of $3,000 (one child) or $6,000 (two or more children). Depending on your income, this is either a 20% or 35% credit, but there is no income cap.

9. New for 2018: The $500 Non-Child Dependent Tax Credit. If you have a dependent who does not qualify for the Child Tax Credit, such as an elderly parent or disabled adult child, you are now eligible for a $500 credit from 2018 through 2025.

Even with the loss of many itemized deductions, you may still be able to reduce your tax bill with these nine above the line deductions and Tax Credits. We want to help professional musicians find Financial Security, whether that is through long-term, diversified investment strategies, by teaching you how to save on taxes, or making sure you can afford to maintain your lifestyle in retirement. If you want an advisor who is knowledgeable about your unique financial needs as a musician, let’s talk about what our program can do for you.

Bonus Depreciation for Self-Employed Musicians

We’ve written extensively about the loss of tax deductions for W-2 musicians under the new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). For self-employed musicians, however, there are some changes for 2018 which may benefit you if you are an Independent Contractor (1099), Sole Proprietor, or have formed an LLC or Corporation. Specifically, Section 179 has been expanded, which enables business owners to expense certain items (take an immediate tax deduction) instead of depreciating those purchases over a longer number of years.

Section 179 has existed for many years, but Congress has continually changed the rules, setting caps on how much you can deduct. At the start of 2017, you could only take bonus depreciation of up to 50%. Under the TCJA, for 2018, bonus depreciation is increased to 100%, the cap increased from $520,000 to $1 million, and now you can also purchase used equipment and receive bonus depreciation.

As a self-employed musician, Section 179 can help you deduct:

  • Equipment for the business, such as musical instruments, sound gear, or accessories
  • Office furniture and office equipment
  • Computers and off the shelf software
  • Business vehicles with a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) of over 6000 pounds

You cannot use Section 179 to deduct the costs of real estate (land, buildings, or improvements), for passenger cars or vehicles under 6000 GVWR, or for property used outside of the United States.

One of the most attractive benefits of Section 179 is the ability to deduct a vehicle for your business. Under Section 179, your first year deduction on a 6000 GVWR vehicle is limited to $25,000. You would first deduct this amount. Second, you are eligible for Bonus Depreciation, which used to be 50%, but now is 100%. That means that a self-employed musician can effectively deduct 100% of any qualifying vehicle in 2018, even if it is a $95,000 Range Rover.

To be deductible, you must use the vehicle for business at least 51% of the time. If you also use the vehicle for personal use, you may only deduct the portion of your expenses attributable to the percentage of business miles. The way to maximize your Section 179 deduction, is to use the vehicle 100% of the time for your business. If the IRS sees you claim 100% business miles on your tax return, you had better have another vehicle for personal use. You might use your spouse’s vehicle, or perhaps keep your old vehicle, for personal miles.

Don’t forget that commuting between home and the office are considered personal miles, not business miles. This works best if your primary office is at home and all of your concerts, gigs, or teaching, are self-employed or 1099. If you are self-employed, then any driving to rehearsals, performances, teaching, business meetings, auditions, etc., would be business miles.

The 6000 pound GVWR requirement doesn’t mean that the vehicle literally weighs over 6000 pounds, but has a total load rating (vehicle, passengers, cargo) over this weight. If a manufacturer lists the weight of the vehicle, that is not the GVWR; the GVWR is often 1500 or more pounds higher than the vehicle weight. Make sure you are looking specifically at the official GVWR. You can generally find the GVWR printed on a sticker in the driver’s door frame to confirm.

The list of qualifying vehicles varies from year to year and from model to model, but includes most full-size trucks, vans, and SUVs. Be careful – sometimes a 4WD model is over 6000, but the 2WD version is not. On one SUV, a model with 3rd row seating was over 6000, but without the extra seats, it was under 6000. An another SUV, 2016 models were over 6000 GVWR, but the new and lighter 2017 model was not.

There are many lists on the internet of which vehicles qualify; in addition to full-size pick-up trucks and vans, most large SUVs such as a Tahoe, Suburban, Expedition, or Escalade are also above 6000 GVWR. Several mini-vans qualify (Honda Odyssey, Dodge Grand Caravan), as do some more medium size SUVs (Jeep Grand Cherokee, Toyota 4Runner, Audi Q7, BMW X5, Ford Explorer). Again, be absolutely certain your vehicle will qualify before making a purchase. One of the nice things about the new law is that now you do not need to buy a new vehicle to qualify for bonus depreciation; used vehicles are also eligible.

Please discuss this with your tax preparer. You cannot deduct more than you earned, so don’t buy a $50,000 SUV if you only show $30,000 in net profits. Similarly, you might be able to now deduct a $100,000 violin, but if you don’t have $100,000 in self-employment income, you might be better off depreciating the instrument over several years. Lastly, consider these caveats:

  • You have a choice between taking the “standard mileage rate” of 54.5 cent/mile for 2018, or using the “actual cost” method. When you take the standard rate, that already includes depreciation. If you use Section 179 to purchase a vehicle, you are going to be locked in to using “actual costs” for the life of that vehicle. You cannot take the Section 179 deduction upfront and later switch the standard mileage rate.
  • If you are using “actual costs”, you can also deduct your other operating expenses such as gasoline, oil changes, maintenance/repairs, insurance, tolls, and parking, but will need to document your costs. Keep those receipts!
  • You may still be required to keep a mileage log (“contemporaneous record” in IRS terms) to prove you are using the vehicle for more than 50% business miles. If business use falls below 50%, you may be required to pay back some of the depreciation. Let’s just say that would be expensive and a headache.
  • If you depreciate 100% of the cost of the vehicle upfront, that will reduce your cost basis to zero. When you sell the vehicle, you may be creating a taxable gain.
  • You may be able to finance a vehicle and still claim an upfront deduction under the Section 179 rules.

Under the TCJA, these expansions to Section 179 are temporary through 2022; after that time, bonus depreciation will be phased back down from 100% to 0%. So if you want to buy an SUV or truck, you have a five-year window to take advantage of this full depreciation.

This tax deduction is especially effective if you have a banner year of high income and anticipate being in a higher tax bracket, because it will let you accelerate future depreciation on a vehicle into the current year, provided the vehicle is purchased and placed into service that year. Please remember that this section 179 deduction is available only to the self-employed and not to W-2 employees.

I feel I should point out that driving a large SUV or truck may not always be the most cost effective decision. I am not suggesting everyone rush out and buy a Suburban just to get a tax deduction. But if you were thinking about buying a vehicle this year, it can certainly help to know about this tax deduction. And it might influence which vehicle you choose to buy!

I see a lot of musicians who keep good records and find out after the fact which expenses they can deduct. But I don’t see a lot of musicians who are proactively making business decisions to maximize their economic benefit. If you’re going to need a vehicle to haul your drums, or harp, amps, or even just yourself, why not choose one where you can potentially deduct the full cost of the vehicle? With the high costs of operation, insurance, and depreciation of any vehicle, I think there are a lot of musicians who would benefit from an actual cost approach, rather than tracking miles using the standard mileage rate. If your musical life involves a lot of windshield time, know your options.

Musicians, You’re About to Lose Your Tax Deductions

Musicians have been asking me if the new tax bill passed by the House yesterday will have any impact on us. Yes, the legislation, if passed in the Senate, will greatly reduce the ability of professional musicians to deduct many of the expenses we incur in our work.

I should state right at the outset that it is possible that your taxes may be lower under the current proposal. That’s because the plan will increase the standard deduction from $6,350 (single) and $12,700 (married) in 2017 to $12,000 and $24,000 in 2018. As a result, it is believed that instead of 33%, the number of taxpayers who itemize will fall to only 10%. But it also means that if you have itemized deductions below $12,000 (single)/$24,000 (married), you will no longer receive any benefit from those expenses in 2018.

And if you have $25,000 of itemized deductions as a married couple, you are actually getting only $1,000 more in deductions than someone who has zero deductions and claims the standard deduction of $24,000. That means you spent $25,000 to only get an additional $1,000 deduction; in the 25% tax bracket, you will save $250, a 1% benefit of the $25,000 you spent.

I think many of us have had more than $12,000 or $24,000 in itemized deductions in the past, however, starting in 2018 the Bill also eliminates many itemized deductions, except for these three which will remain:

  • Charitable Donations
  • Property Taxes, now with a $10,000 cap
  • Mortgage Interest, reduced from two properties to one, and reduced from a $1 million loan to $500,000 maximum 

You will no longer be able to deduct:

  • Unreimbursed Employee Expenses
  • Medical Expenses that exceed 7.5% or 10% of your income
  • Tax Preparation Fees
  • Moving For Work (over 50 miles)
  • Gambling Losses or Casualty Losses
  • The $7,500 tax credit for a plug-in electric vehicle will be repealed

The first one, Unreimbursed Employee Expenses, is a huge hit to musicians who often spend tens of thousands on an instrument and supplies. There aren’t too many other jobs where an employer expects you to have $5,000, $50,000, or $500,000 in “tools” as a requirement of your employment. In addition to “Tools and Supplies”, losing Unreimbursed Employee Expenses also means you can no longer deduct:

  • Union membership and work dues
  • Dues to professional societies
  • Home office expenses
  • Educator expenses and college research expenses
  • Travel, mileage, and meals for work
  • Required concert clothes

This applies to musicians who are “employees” and receive a W-2 at the end of the year. When you are an employee, expenses go on Schedule A as itemized deductions. Other times, however, musicians are “independent contractors” and receive a 1099. If you are an independent contractor, you list business expenses on Schedule C and these expenses will continue to be valid under the Bill. It may be more advantageous for a musician to be an Independent Contractor if this Bill becomes a Law.

Many musicians have both W-2 income (say from a school or full-time orchestra) and 1099 income (church gigs, part-time orchestra, etc.). You will probably want to apply as many expenses as possible towards your 1099/Schedule C income going forward.

Please don’t take any steps until the final version has been made into law. However, if the House version passes the Senate, I think many musicians will want to be prepared to take steps to pay 2018 expenses before December 31, 2017. If you wait until January, either you will either lose those miscellaneous itemized deductions or may be below $24,000 under the new rules and end up taking the standard deduction. Better to take those expenses in 2017 and receive a benefit.

  1. Consider paying your property taxes in December 2017 rather than January 2018
  2. Make your 2018 charitable donations in 2017
  3. If you have unreimbursed employee expenses, go ahead and purchase reed supplies, music, concert clothes, etc. before the end of 2017
  4. Where musical expenses are genuinely part of your 1099 income, you will still be able to subtract those expenses on Schedule C. Look at past tax returns, how much of your income is W-2 versus 1099? If you continually lose money on your Schedule C, the IRS may rule that your “business” is actually a hobby and disallow your losses.
  5. If you want to reduce your taxes further, look instead at increasing your contributions to pre-tax accounts such as a 401(k), 403(b), Traditional IRA, SEP-IRA, HSA, or FSA. These are still going to be valid ways to reduce your taxable income.

Does your financial planner understand what it means to be a professional musician? We have deep expertise in helping musicians succeed with their financial goals. Send me an email and we can help you, too.

 

Is Your Car Eligible for a $7,500 Tax Credit?

As a free-lance musician, I can think of many times when I have spent three hours or more in the car, round-trip, for a two and a half hour rehearsal. In most cases, our pay for a gig is fixed, so the only way to take home more money is to reduce our expenses.

If you are in the market for a fuel-efficient vehicle, you may want to know about a tax credit available for the purchase an electric or plug-in hybrid vehicle. Worth up to $7,500, the credit is not a tax deduction from your income, but a dollar for dollar reduction in your federal income tax liability. In other words, if your tax bill was $19,000 and you have a $7,500 credit, you will pay only $11,500 and get the rest back.

This credit has been available since 2010, but in the last two years a significant number of new car models have become eligible for the tax credit. If you drive a lot of miles, these cars may be worth a look.

The credit includes 100% electric vehicles like the Tesla Model S or the Nissan Leaf, and it applies to the newer plug-in hybrid models, including the BMW i3, Chevrolet Volt, Ford C-Max Energi, Hyundai Sonata Plug-In Hybrid, and others. The credit does not apply to all hybrid vehicles, only those with plug-in technology. While the plug-in cars may be more expensive than regular hybrids, they are often less expensive once you factor in the tax credit.

The amount of the credit varies depending on the battery in the car, and may be less than $7,500. The credit is phased out for each manufacturer after they hit 200,000 eligible vehicles sold, with the credit falling to 50% and then to 25%. So, for those 400,000 people who put down a deposit on the Tesla Model 3, most will not be getting the full $7,500 tax credit. Only purchases of new vehicles – not used – are eligible for the credit.

The program is under Internal Revenue Code 30D; you can find full information on the IRS website here. An easier-to-read primer on the program is available at www.fueleconomy.gov.

Some states also offer tax credits or vouchers for the purchase of a plug-in hybrid or electric vehicle. Unfortunately, Texas is not one of those states! You can search for your state’s programs on the US Department of Energy website, the Alternative Fuels Data Center.

Do you have a plug-in hybrid or electric vehicle? Send me a note and tell me how you like it.

Deducting Concert Clothes

A professional musician’s purchase of concert clothing is a tax-deductible expense, but you need to make sure that you meet the IRS requirements for “uniforms” in order to ensure that the expense is allowable. The IRS has a two-part test to determine if work clothing is tax-deductible:

  1. You are required to wear the clothes as a condition of your job.
  2. The clothes are not suitable for everyday wear.

If you are a W-2 employee, you will deduct concert clothes on your Schedule A, under Miscellaneous Expenses, as an unreimbursed employee expense. This category of expenses is, unfortunately, subject to a 2% limit, meaning that only your expenses which exceed 2% of your adjusted gross income are eligible for the deduction. Luckily, the list of Miscellaneous Expenses subject to the 2% limit is large and includes other popular deductions, including professional dues, home office expenses, tools and supplies, travel for work, union dues, tax preparation fees, and investment management fees. So most musicians have little trouble breaking the 2% limit, although it still means that you don’t get any tax deduction on the first 2% of your expenses. If your AGI is $50,000, that is $1,000 in expenses that are not counted every year!

The IRS states that “Musicians and entertainers can deduct the cost of theatrical clothing and accessories that aren’t suitable for everyday wear.” Clearly, tails and tuxedos are not everyday wear, but other concert clothes for men and women, such as black pants or shoes, could be considered for everyday use. The IRS cautions that it is not enough that you do not wear your work clothes away from work; the requirement is that the clothes are “not suitable for taking the place of your everyday clothing.”

For details, see Miscellaneous Expenses, IRS Publication 529.

If you are paid as a 1099 (independent contractor), you can deduct your required concert clothes on Schedule C as a business expense, which is not subject to the 2% requirement. If you have both W-2 and 1099 gigs, you may be able to allocate your concert clothes as would be beneficial for your tax return, assuming both employers require the clothes.

In the event your tax return is audited, you should be able to provide documentation to support your deduction, including:

  • receipts describing the clothes purchased;
  • documents from your employer listing the required dress code;
  • you will need to say both that you do not wear the clothes at any time other than concerts AND that the clothing is not suitable for everyday use. I would suggest using the exact wording “not suitable”. While the IRS does not define “not suitable” in their instructions, that is the requirement.